If you would like to support this site, please consider Donating.
Useful Tropical Plants

Senegalia nigrescens

(Oliv.) P.Hurter

Fabaceae


Classification of the genus Acacia (in the wider sense) has been subject to considerable debate. It is generally agreed that there are valid reasons for breaking it up into several distinct genera, but there has been disagreement over the way this should be done. As of 2017, it is widely (but not completely) accepted that the section that includes the majority of the Australian species should retain the name Acacia, whilst other sections of the genus should be transferred to other genera. This species is transferred to Senegalia[
K
Title
Plants for a Future
Author
Ken Fern
Description
Notes from observations, tasting etc at Plants For A Future and on field trips.
].

+ Synonyms

Acacia brosigii Harms

Acacia nigrescens Oliv.

Acacia pallens (Benth.) Rolfe

Acacia passargei Harms

Acacia perrottii Warb.

Acacia schliebenii Harms

Albizia lugardii N.E.Br.

Common Name:

Senegalia nigrescens
Plant growing in the Pretoria National Botanical Garden, South Africa
Photograph by: JMK
Creative Commons License
Senegalia nigrescens Senegalia nigrescens Senegalia nigrescens Senegalia nigrescens Senegalia nigrescens Senegalia nigrescens Senegalia nigrescens

General Information

Senegalia nigrescens is a spiny, deciduous tree with a conical crown when young, becoming more rounded as it gets older. It usually grows up to 20 metres tall, exceptionally to 30 metres, with a bole that is usually straight and up to 75cm in diameter. The bole usually has many prickles growing on large knobs, but these are often absent in old trees, The smaller branches have pairs of hooked, blackish prickles up to 7 mm long just below the nodes[
299
Title
Protabase - Plant Resources of Tropical Africa.
Publication
 
Author
 
Website
http://www.prota.org
Publisher
 
Year
0
ISBN
 
Description
An excellent on-line database with detailed information on over 3,200 species of useful plants of Africa.
].
The tree is harvested from the wild, mainly for its timber, though it does also have minor medicinal applications. It is used locally.

Known Hazards

Especially in times of drought, many Acacia species can concentrate high levels of the toxin Hydrogen cyanide in their foliage, making them dangerous for herbivores to eat.

Botanical References


Range

East Africa - Tanzania, Zambia, Malawi, Mozambique, Botswana, Zimbabwe, S. Africa.

Habitat

Woodland and bushland, commonly near rivers, usually on shallow soils on rocky hillsides and on alluvial soils in the valleys; often common and locally dominant on loamy soils. Found at elevations up to 1,200 metres, exceptionally to 1,600 metres[
299
Title
Protabase - Plant Resources of Tropical Africa.
Publication
 
Author
 
Website
http://www.prota.org
Publisher
 
Year
0
ISBN
 
Description
An excellent on-line database with detailed information on over 3,200 species of useful plants of Africa.
].

Properties

Medicinal Rating *  *
Other Uses Rating *  *  *
HabitDeciduous Tree
Height15.00 m
PollinatorsBees
Cultivation StatusWild

Cultivation Details



Growth is slow, with a maximum annual increment of 60cm in height, usually much less[
299
Title
Protabase - Plant Resources of Tropical Africa.
Publication
 
Author
 
Website
http://www.prota.org
Publisher
 
Year
0
ISBN
 
Description
An excellent on-line database with detailed information on over 3,200 species of useful plants of Africa.
].
The tree is completely deciduous and bare for several months, frequently flowering when leafless. The flowers are an important food resource to giraffe in the late dry season, and it has been suggested that giraffe could be a pollen vector[
299
Title
Protabase - Plant Resources of Tropical Africa.
Publication
 
Author
 
Website
http://www.prota.org
Publisher
 
Year
0
ISBN
 
Description
An excellent on-line database with detailed information on over 3,200 species of useful plants of Africa.
].
The tree usually survives bush fires, resprouting from the base when top-killed[
299
Title
Protabase - Plant Resources of Tropical Africa.
Publication
 
Author
 
Website
http://www.prota.org
Publisher
 
Year
0
ISBN
 
Description
An excellent on-line database with detailed information on over 3,200 species of useful plants of Africa.
,
1296
Title
Trees and Shrubs of the Okavango Delta; Medicinal Uses and Nutritional Value
Publication
The Shell Field Guide Series: Part 1
Author
Roodt V.
Publisher
Shell Oil Botswana (Pty) Ltd; Gaborone, Botswana
Year
1998
ISBN
99912-0-241-2
Description
A concise guide to some of the trees and shrubs of Botswana, often giving some of the plant's uses.
].
This species has a symbiotic relationship with certain soil bacteria, these bacteria form nodules on the roots and fix atmospheric nitrogen. Some of this nitrogen is utilized by the growing plant but some can also be used by other plants growing nearby[
299
Title
Protabase - Plant Resources of Tropical Africa.
Publication
 
Author
 
Website
http://www.prota.org
Publisher
 
Year
0
ISBN
 
Description
An excellent on-line database with detailed information on over 3,200 species of useful plants of Africa.
].

Edible Uses

None known

Medicinal

Traditional healers of the Shona people in Zimbabwe make an ointment from burnt roots to treat convulsions[
299
Title
Protabase - Plant Resources of Tropical Africa.
Publication
 
Author
 
Website
http://www.prota.org
Publisher
 
Year
0
ISBN
 
Description
An excellent on-line database with detailed information on over 3,200 species of useful plants of Africa.
].

A root decoction is used as an aphrodisiac[
299
Title
Protabase - Plant Resources of Tropical Africa.
Publication
 
Author
 
Website
http://www.prota.org
Publisher
 
Year
0
ISBN
 
Description
An excellent on-line database with detailed information on over 3,200 species of useful plants of Africa.
].

The bark of all Acacia species contains greater or lesser quantities of tannins and are astringent. Astringents are often used medicinally - taken internally, for example. they are used in the treatment of diarrhoea and dysentery, and can also be helpful in cases of internal bleeding. Applied externally, often as a wash, they are used to treat wounds and other skin problems, haemorrhoids, perspiring feet, some eye problems, as a mouth wash etc[
601
Title
The Useful Native Plants of Australia.
Publication
 
Author
Maiden J.H.
Website
http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org
Publisher
Turner & Co.; London.
Year
1889
ISBN
 
Description
Terse details of the uses of many Australian plants and other species naturalised, or at least growing, in Australia. It can be downloaded from the Internet.
,
K
Title
Plants for a Future
Author
Ken Fern
Description
Notes from observations, tasting etc at Plants For A Future and on field trips.
].
Many Acacia trees also yield greater or lesser quantities of a gum from the trunk and stems. This is sometimes taken internally in the treatment of diarrhoea and haemorrhoids[
601
Title
The Useful Native Plants of Australia.
Publication
 
Author
Maiden J.H.
Website
http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org
Publisher
Turner & Co.; London.
Year
1889
ISBN
 
Description
Terse details of the uses of many Australian plants and other species naturalised, or at least growing, in Australia. It can be downloaded from the Internet.
].

Agroforestry Uses:

Honey bees are particularly fond of the nectar from this plant, and produce a good quality honey from it[
1296
Title
Trees and Shrubs of the Okavango Delta; Medicinal Uses and Nutritional Value
Publication
The Shell Field Guide Series: Part 1
Author
Roodt V.
Publisher
Shell Oil Botswana (Pty) Ltd; Gaborone, Botswana
Year
1998
ISBN
99912-0-241-2
Description
A concise guide to some of the trees and shrubs of Botswana, often giving some of the plant's uses.
].

Other Uses

The bark is a source of tannins[
299
Title
Protabase - Plant Resources of Tropical Africa.
Publication
 
Author
 
Website
http://www.prota.org
Publisher
 
Year
0
ISBN
 
Description
An excellent on-line database with detailed information on over 3,200 species of useful plants of Africa.
].

The inner bark can be used to make twine[
1296
Title
Trees and Shrubs of the Okavango Delta; Medicinal Uses and Nutritional Value
Publication
The Shell Field Guide Series: Part 1
Author
Roodt V.
Publisher
Shell Oil Botswana (Pty) Ltd; Gaborone, Botswana
Year
1998
ISBN
99912-0-241-2
Description
A concise guide to some of the trees and shrubs of Botswana, often giving some of the plant's uses.
].

The heartwood is dark brown, with light and darker streaks; it is distinctly demarcated from the narrow, whitish yellow sapwood. The grain is often irregular; texture moderately coarse and even. The wood is very heavy; very hard; it has very good natural durability, being extremely resistant to fungal, borer and termite attack. It is difficult to saw, even when green, and dulls tool edges; a good finish can be obtained with waxes and oil. The wood is used for parquet flooring, carving, turnery, fence posts, railway sleepers and mine props. It is occasionally made into furniture, although it is usually considered too heavy for this purpose[
299
Title
Protabase - Plant Resources of Tropical Africa.
Publication
 
Author
 
Website
http://www.prota.org
Publisher
 
Year
0
ISBN
 
Description
An excellent on-line database with detailed information on over 3,200 species of useful plants of Africa.
].
The wood is used as firewood and for charcoal production[
299
Title
Protabase - Plant Resources of Tropical Africa.
Publication
 
Author
 
Website
http://www.prota.org
Publisher
 
Year
0
ISBN
 
Description
An excellent on-line database with detailed information on over 3,200 species of useful plants of Africa.
].

Propagation

Seed - easy to produce in the nursery the seeds are usually sown into seedbeds, but sowing directly into pots is also possible because of the high germination rate. Seedlings suitable for transplanting have been produced in less than 9 months[
299
Title
Protabase - Plant Resources of Tropical Africa.
Publication
 
Author
 
Website
http://www.prota.org
Publisher
 
Year
0
ISBN
 
Description
An excellent on-line database with detailed information on over 3,200 species of useful plants of Africa.
].
The seed of many members of this genus has a hard seedcoat and may benefit from scarification before sowing to speed up germination. This can usually be done by pouring a small amount of nearly boiling water on the seeds (being careful not to cook them!) and then soaking them for 12 - 24 hours in warm water. By this time they should have imbibed moisture and swollen - if they have not, then carefully make a nick in the seedcoat (being careful not to damage the embryo) and soak for a further 12 hours before sowing.
Cite as: Tropical Plants Database, Ken Fern. tropical.theferns.info. 2020-09-29. <tropical.theferns.info/viewtropical.php?id=Senegalia+nigrescens>

Add a Comment:

If you have any useful information about this plant, please leave a comment. Comments have to be approved before they are shown here.