If you would like to support this site, please consider Donating.
Useful Tropical Plants

Julbernardia paniculata

(Benth.) Troupin

Fabaceae

+ Synonyms

Berlinia baumii Harms

Berlinia paniculata Benth.

Isoberlinia baumii (Harms) P.A.Duvign.

Isoberlinia paniculata (Benth.) Hutch. ex Greenway

Julbernardia baumii (Harms) Troupin

Pseudoberlinia baumii (Harms) P.A.Duvign.

Pseudoberlinia paniculata (Benth.) P.A.Duvign.

Common Name:

Julbernardia paniculata
Flowering branch
Photograph by: Günter Baumann; African plants - A Photo Guide
© Günter Baumann
Julbernardia paniculata Julbernardia paniculata Julbernardia paniculata Julbernardia paniculata

General Information

Julbernardia paniculata is an evergreen tree with a much-branched, flat-topped crown; it can grow from 2 - 20 metres tall. The straight bole can be 25 - 80cm in diameter[
328
Title
African Flowering Plants Database
Publication
 
Author
 
Website
http://www.ville-ge.ch/musinfo/bd/cjb/africa/recherche.php
Publisher
Conservatoire et Jardin Botaniques.
Year
0
ISBN
 
Description
Contains information on over 150,000 plant names (including synonyms) giving a description and habitat, plus a distribution map.
,
610
Title
Flora of Tropical East Africa
Publication
 
Author
Beentje H.J.
Website
http://plants.jstor.org/search?st=396814
Publisher
Royal Botanic Gardens; Kew.
Year
2002
ISBN
 
Description
Available on-line, a modern flora of East Africa.
].
The tree is harvested from the wild for local use as a source of fibre.

Known Hazards

None known

Botanical References

610
Title
Flora of Tropical East Africa
Publication
 
Author
Beentje H.J.
Website
http://plants.jstor.org/search?st=396814
Publisher
Royal Botanic Gardens; Kew.
Year
2002
ISBN
 
Description
Available on-line, a modern flora of East Africa.

Range

Tropical Africa - Angola, southern DR Congo, Zambia, Malawi, Zimbabwe, Mozambique.

Habitat

Deciduous woodland, usually occurring with Brachystegia floribunda; poor plateau soils; Kalahari sands; covers extensive areas; dominant in open grassy woods on sand; savannah exposed to fires; at elevations from 1,000 - 1,700 metres[
328
Title
African Flowering Plants Database
Publication
 
Author
 
Website
http://www.ville-ge.ch/musinfo/bd/cjb/africa/recherche.php
Publisher
Conservatoire et Jardin Botaniques.
Year
0
ISBN
 
Description
Contains information on over 150,000 plant names (including synonyms) giving a description and habitat, plus a distribution map.
].

Properties

Other Uses Rating *  *
HabitEvergreen Tree
Height13.00 m
Cultivation StatusWild

Cultivation Details



Although many species within the family Fabaceae have a symbiotic relationship with soil bacteria, this species is said to be devoid of such a relationship and therefore does not fix atmospheric nitrogen[
755
Title
Nodulation Plants in GRIN Taxonomy
Publication
 
Author
 
Website
http://www.ars-grin.gov/~sbmljw/cgi-bin/taxnodul.pl?language=en
Publisher
United States Department of Agriculture
Year
0
ISBN
 
Description
An online database listing plants that have either positive or negative reports on root and stem nodulation with nitrogen-fixing bacteria.
].

Edible Uses

None known

Medicinal

None known

Other Uses

The fibrous bark is used for making bark cloth[
883
Title
Bulletin of Miscellaneous Information
Publication
 
Author
 
Website
http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org
Publisher
Royal Botanic Gardens; Kew
Year
1923
ISBN
 
Description
A botanical journal, it contains a rather dated but still useful treatment of the genus Brachystegia with quite a lot of information on plant uses. It can be downloaded from the Internet.
]. The trunk is stripped to a height of 2.5 – 3 metres according to the height at which the branches fork. The stripped trunk is smeared with cow-dung and wrapped round with plaintain leaves - a new bark soon forms which is ready to be used for bark-cloth within 12 months. The third and fourth barks thus obtained are considered the finest in quality, though the tree might yield up to eight or more barks.
The thin outer bark is scraped off the inner bark and discarded. The inner bark is left during the night to dry, and any soft, pulpy substance is scraped off the inside. The strips of bark, which are some 120 – 180cm long and 45cm wide, are laid on a log with a flattened surface and beaten with a mallet until they are the thickness of strong brown paper, by which time they will be 180 – 270cm long and 120cm wide. It is then spread out in the sun to dry, the exposure to light giving the upper surface a tint somewhat like terra-cotta, while the underside is of a lighter shade. Any holes or flaws in the cloth are cut into neat squares and patched with pieces taken from the edges so deftly that in a well-made bark-cloth they are not noticeable. These cloths are usually made up into sheets 2.4 metres square, two lengths being stitched together and pressed in such a manner that the seam is not seen when the cloth is being worn. Strips of fibre from the dry plantain stem are used for thread.

Propagation

Seed -

Add a Comment:

If you have any useful information about this plant, please leave a comment. Comments have to be approved before they are shown here.