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Useful Tropical Plants

Deguelia amazonica

Killip

Fabaceae


This species is based on Lonchocarpus negrensis Benth.(1860). It was transferred first to the genus Derris as Derris amazonica Killip because Taubert (1891) had already proposed Deguelia negrensis for a different species[
1416
Title
A synopsis of the genus Deguelia (Leguminosae, Papilionoideae, Millettieae) in Brazil
Publication
Brittonia, DOI 10.1007/s12228-013-9302-4
Author
Camargo R.A. & Azevedo Tozzi A.M.G.
Publisher
 
Year
2013
ISBN
1938-436X
Description
 
].

+ Synonyms

Lonchocarpus negrensis Benth.

Derris amazonica Killip

Common Name: Timbo Branco

No Image.

General Information

Deguelia amazonica is a climbing shrub with vigorous, woody stems that can be 30 metres or more long and twine high into the surrounding vegetation. The stems can be up to 50mm in diameter[
434
Title
Flora of Peru
Publication
 
Author
Macbride. J.F.
Publisher
Field Museum of Natural History
Year
1936
ISBN
 
Description
An excellent attempt at a Flora of Peru, though it is clear that many of the plants were imperfectly known at that time and so information on them was sketchy. Available for download from the Internet.
,
1420
Title
Rotenone-Yielding Plants of South America
Publication
American Journal of Botany 24 (9) 573-587 1937
Author
Krukoff B.A. & Smith A.C.
Publisher
 
Year
1937
ISBN
 
Description
 
].
The roots contain the insecticide rotenone, though probably not in sufficient quantities for commercial exploitation.

Known Hazards

The plant contains rotenone and has been used traditionally as a fish poison - the rotenone kills or stuns the fish making them easy to catch, but the fish remain perfectly edible for mammals. Rotenone is classified by the World Health Organization as moderately hazardous. It is mildly toxic to humans and other mammals, but extremely toxic to many insects (hence its use as an insecticide) and aquatic life, including fish. This higher toxicity in fish and insects is because the lipophilic rotenone is easily taken up through the gills or trachea, but not as easily through the skin or the gastrointestinal tract. The lowest lethal dose for a child is 143 mg/kg, but human deaths from rotenone poisoning are rare because its irritating action causes vomiting. Deliberate ingestion of rotenone, however, can be fatal.
The compound decomposes when exposed to sunlight and usually has an activity of six days in the environment.

Botanical References

434
Title
Flora of Peru
Publication
 
Author
Macbride. J.F.
Publisher
Field Museum of Natural History
Year
1936
ISBN
 
Description
An excellent attempt at a Flora of Peru, though it is clear that many of the plants were imperfectly known at that time and so information on them was sketchy. Available for download from the Internet.
,
1420
Title
Rotenone-Yielding Plants of South America
Publication
American Journal of Botany 24 (9) 573-587 1937
Author
Krukoff B.A. & Smith A.C.
Publisher
 
Year
1937
ISBN
 
Description
 

Range

Northern S. America - Bolivia, Peru, Colombia, Venezuela, northern Brazil, the Guyanas

Habitat

Undisturbed forests, river banks and 'igarapé', generally preferring 'terra firme' with clay soils, in non-inundated areas, although it can occur in sandy soils and in seasonally inundated lowland[
1416
Title
A synopsis of the genus Deguelia (Leguminosae, Papilionoideae, Millettieae) in Brazil
Publication
Brittonia, DOI 10.1007/s12228-013-9302-4
Author
Camargo R.A. & Azevedo Tozzi A.M.G.
Publisher
 
Year
2013
ISBN
1938-436X
Description
 
].

Properties

Other Uses Rating *  *
HabitClimber
Height20.00 m
PollinatorsInsects
Cultivation StatusWild

Cultivation Details


Often found in the wild in shallow and sandy soils that are too poor to support high forest[
1420
Title
Rotenone-Yielding Plants of South America
Publication
American Journal of Botany 24 (9) 573-587 1937
Author
Krukoff B.A. & Smith A.C.
Publisher
 
Year
1937
ISBN
 
Description
 
].
This species has a symbiotic relationship with certain soil bacteria; these bacteria form nodules on the roots and fix atmospheric nitrogen. Some of this nitrogen is utilized by the growing plant but some can also be used by other plants growing nearby[
1309
Title
The Leguminosae; A Source Book of Characteristics, Uses and Nodulation
Publication
 
Author
Allen O.N.; Allen E.K.
Publisher
University of Wisconsin
Year
1981
ISBN
0-333-32221-5
Description
An amazing and comprehensive work, giving a brief guide to the many genera of the family Fabaceae and also the principle uses of the genus.
].

Edible Uses

None known

Medicinal

None known

Other Uses

The roots are a source of rotenone, which is widely used as an insecticide[
345
Title
Minor Products of Philippine Forests
Publication
 
Author
Brown. W. H.
Publisher
Bureau of Forestry, Manilla.
Year
1920
ISBN
 
Description
A useful guide to some of the plants of the area, though terse on details. The book is out of copyright and can be legally downloaded from the Internet.
,
1309
Title
The Leguminosae; A Source Book of Characteristics, Uses and Nodulation
Publication
 
Author
Allen O.N.; Allen E.K.
Publisher
University of Wisconsin
Year
1981
ISBN
0-333-32221-5
Description
An amazing and comprehensive work, giving a brief guide to the many genera of the family Fabaceae and also the principle uses of the genus.
]. Rotenone is effective against a range of horticultural pests, such as aphids and caterpillars, and also against external body parasites like ticks, lice, fleas and flies. It is reported to be ineffective against bedbugs, cockroaches, scale insects and red spiders.[
310
Title
Plant Resources of Southeast Asia
Publication
 
Author
 
Website
http://proseanet.org/
Publisher
 
Year
0
ISBN
 
Description
Lots of information on the uses of the plants of SE Asia.
,
418
Title
Ecocrop
Publication
 
Author
 
Website
http://ecocrop.fao.org/ecocrop/srv/en/home
Publisher
 
Year
0
ISBN
 
Description
Basic information on a wide range of useful plants, plus details of environmental needs where available.
,
1309
Title
The Leguminosae; A Source Book of Characteristics, Uses and Nodulation
Publication
 
Author
Allen O.N.; Allen E.K.
Publisher
University of Wisconsin
Year
1981
ISBN
0-333-32221-5
Description
An amazing and comprehensive work, giving a brief guide to the many genera of the family Fabaceae and also the principle uses of the genus.
]. This species does not produce enough rotenone to make it worthwhile for commercial production[
1420
Title
Rotenone-Yielding Plants of South America
Publication
American Journal of Botany 24 (9) 573-587 1937
Author
Krukoff B.A. & Smith A.C.
Publisher
 
Year
1937
ISBN
 
Description
 
]. The rotenone can be found in various parts of the plant, but is generally most abundant in the bark, especially of the roots. The bark can be dried and powdered for use as an insecticidal dust[
K
Title
Plants for a Future
Author
Ken Fern
Description
Notes from observations, tasting etc at Plants For A Future and on field trips.
].

Propagation

Seed - best sown as soon as it is ripe in a partially shaded position in a nursery seedbed. A high germination rate can be expected, with the seed sprouting within a few days[
420
Title
Brazilian Trees. Volume 2. 4th Edition.
Publication
 
Author
Lorenzi. H.
Publisher
Instituto Plantarum De Estudos Da Flora; Brazil.
Year
2002
ISBN
85-86714-15-1
Description
Information on 350 species of Brazilian trees. Stunning photographs of each species, brief details on the plant, its uses and how to grow it from seed. A superb work, with the minor irritation that the translation from Portuguese is not of the best.
].
Like many species within the family Fabaceae, once they have been dried for storage the seeds of this species may benefit from scarification before sowing in order to speed up and improve germination. This can usually be done by pouring a small amount of nearly boiling water on the seeds (being careful not to cook them!) and then soaking them for 12 - 24 hours in warm water. By this time they should have imbibed moisture and swollen - if they have not, then carefully make a nick in the seedcoat (being careful not to damage the embryo) and soak for a further 12 hours before sowing[
K
Title
Plants for a Future
Author
Ken Fern
Description
Notes from observations, tasting etc at Plants For A Future and on field trips.
].
Cite as: Tropical Plants Database, Ken Fern. tropical.theferns.info. 2018-12-11. <tropical.theferns.info/viewtropical.php?id=Deguelia+amazonica>

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